haikusfornewborns:

haikusfornewborns:

haikusfornewborns:

Interactive Infographic

Touch our infographic and explore 24 powerful breastfeeding stories and read Save the Children’s new breastfeeding report: Superfood for Babies.

advocatingforthefirsthour:

Babies are always “in fashion.” And it seems lately, they are the hottest accessory. Even England’s Royal Family is adding this “must have.” One thing that hasn’t been the coolest of topics is breastfeeding (this post will be pro-breastfeeding, but not in a judgmental way). And a woman’s choice on whether she pursues that or not. So, for the sake of argument, we’ll pretend that there isn’t a choice. Because in most developing countries, it shouldn’t be. Breastfeeding is critical to preventing malnutrition and saving children’s lives in the developing world. Breastfeeding immediately (within the first hour) after birth could help save 830,000 newborn babies from dying a year, and exclusive breastfeeding for six months could save even more babies and children. Read more about Brandi’s wonderful breastfeeding journey at The Power of the First Hour: Save the Children « the fair trade fashionistas)

I am a mama and self-proclaimed “fair trade fashionista.” I believe in educating consumers and encouraging them to play a more active role in their consumption choices. I also hope to spur conversations, thoughts and feelings about topics that may seem overwhelming at times, until readers realize that the famous quote of Margaret Mead’s is true: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”
Read Brandi’s blog at thefairtradefashionistas.wordpress.com.
 

advocatingforthefirsthour:

Babies are always “in fashion.” And it seems lately, they are the hottest accessory. Even England’s Royal Family is adding this “must have.” One thing that hasn’t been the coolest of topics is breastfeeding (this post will be pro-breastfeeding, but not in a judgmental way). And a woman’s choice on whether she pursues that or not. So, for the sake of argument, we’ll pretend that there isn’t a choice. Because in most developing countries, it shouldn’t be. Breastfeeding is critical to preventing malnutrition and saving children’s lives in the developing world. Breastfeeding immediately (within the first hour) after birth could help save 830,000 newborn babies from dying a year, and exclusive breastfeeding for six months could save even more babies and children. Read more about Brandi’s wonderful breastfeeding journey at The Power of the First Hour: Save the Children « the fair trade fashionistas)

I am a mama and self-proclaimed “fair trade fashionista.” I believe in educating consumers and encouraging them to play a more active role in their consumption choices. I also hope to spur conversations, thoughts and feelings about topics that may seem overwhelming at times, until readers realize that the famous quote of Margaret Mead’s is true: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”

Read Brandi’s blog at thefairtradefashionistas.wordpress.com.

 

Here is a video recap of hours 17 - 24 of sharing moms’ breastfeeding stories. We shared breastfeeding stories every hour for 24 hours starting on Feb. 21, 2013 to show our support for Save the Children’s new breastfeeding report, Superfood for Babies

It happened for the first time two weeks ago. My 10-month-old baby got sick.
Up until then, she has had no sniffles. No runny noses. No fevers. No ear infections or aches. No doctor’s visits. Not-a-one.
At ten months, she’s eating a wonderfully colorful diet of fruits, vegetables, organic meats, and dairy products; she also still nurses. Though I am grateful every day for the many merits of breastfeeding, never have I been more grateful than when she recently caught that small stomach bug. As I breastfed her, it struck me again how powerful breastfeeding is for the prevention of illnesses – here in the USA and around the world. Read more of Stephanie’s story at Saving Babies’ Lives - one boob at a time - Metropolitan Mama. 

Stephanie Sheaffer is a writer, reader, entrepreneur, and the mother of three little girls. She is the founder of Metropolitan Mama and editor-in-chief of TucsonTopia. Find her on Twitter @stephsday and on Pinterest @stephanielikes.

It happened for the first time two weeks ago. My 10-month-old baby got sick.

Up until then, she has had no sniffles. No runny noses. No fevers. No ear infections or aches. No doctor’s visits. Not-a-one.

At ten months, she’s eating a wonderfully colorful diet of fruits, vegetables, organic meats, and dairy products; she also still nurses. Though I am grateful every day for the many merits of breastfeeding, never have I been more grateful than when she recently caught that small stomach bug. As I breastfed her, it struck me again how powerful breastfeeding is for the prevention of illnesses – here in the USA and around the world. Read more of Stephanie’s story at Saving Babies’ Lives - one boob at a time - Metropolitan Mama

Stephanie Sheaffer is a writer, reader, entrepreneur, and the mother of three little girls. She is the founder of Metropolitan Mama and editor-in-chief of TucsonTopia. Find her on Twitter @stephsday and on Pinterest @stephanielikes.

Here is a video recap of hours 9 - 16. We have been sharing breastfeeding stories every hour since 9 AM EST yesterday to show our support for Save the Children’s new breastfeeding report, Superfood for Babies. We will be sharing for 24 straight hours. 

I grew up seeing moms breastfeeding their babies and, thanks God, hardly hearing sad histories about that. When I was 7 years old my youngest sister, Tiffany, was born and I remember how beautiful my Mother looked breastfeeding her until she was a big baby, even after start eating some food. I believe that example – and also the stories about my Grandmother Matsuno, who breastfeed all of 8 children and the youngest son (born when she was 42 years old!) until 2 years old! – made me almost ready to do the same for my children.
Example is important, but also is information. When my fist son was born, besides I was prepared to breastfeed, I knew anything about First Hour and my baby came to me almost 3 hours after my emergency all c-section. For the second child I tried to reduce this time between birth and breastfeed, but it was still 2 hours. Now that I’m pregnant with our third baby, I decided to breastfeed right after she was born and I already communicate the hospital and team who will be with me there. Read more at Breasfeeding and advocating for the first hour | A Vida Como A Vida Quer (@avidaquer)

I grew up seeing moms breastfeeding their babies and, thanks God, hardly hearing sad histories about that. When I was 7 years old my youngest sister, Tiffany, was born and I remember how beautiful my Mother looked breastfeeding her until she was a big baby, even after start eating some food. I believe that example – and also the stories about my Grandmother Matsuno, who breastfeed all of 8 children and the youngest son (born when she was 42 years old!) until 2 years old! – made me almost ready to do the same for my children.

Example is important, but also is information. When my fist son was born, besides I was prepared to breastfeed, I knew anything about First Hour and my baby came to me almost 3 hours after my emergency all c-section. For the second child I tried to reduce this time between birth and breastfeed, but it was still 2 hours. Now that I’m pregnant with our third baby, I decided to breastfeed right after she was born and I already communicate the hospital and team who will be with me there. Read more at Breasfeeding and advocating for the first hour | A Vida Como A Vida Quer (@avidaquer)

When I lost my breast milk supply after attending my first blogging conference last summer, I learned how fragile that part of my identity was. I love every aspect of providing nutrition for my children, but breastfeeding doesn’t come without its challenges.
Breastfeeding mothers everywhere should have access to information that allows them to make an informed choice and the support they need to breastfeed. Even in developed countries, where we needn’t worry about the quality of our water or question the integrity of formula makers, we still have a long way to go to support breastfeeding moms.
Read Vanessa’s story at Nature’s Most Splendid Superfood: Breast Milk - De Su Mama. 

Writer and legacy builder at De Su Mama (www.desumama.com), Vanessa is building a legacy for her biracial children through memoir writing, explorations of personal identity and the documentation of parenting values, traditions, travel and food culture. She is a bicultural Latina in an interracial marriage who believes in creating a purposed legacy and is driven to help other parents do the same.

When I lost my breast milk supply after attending my first blogging conference last summer, I learned how fragile that part of my identity was. I love every aspect of providing nutrition for my children, but breastfeeding doesn’t come without its challenges.

Breastfeeding mothers everywhere should have access to information that allows them to make an informed choice and the support they need to breastfeed. Even in developed countries, where we needn’t worry about the quality of our water or question the integrity of formula makers, we still have a long way to go to support breastfeeding moms.

Read Vanessa’s story at Nature’s Most Splendid Superfood: Breast Milk - De Su Mama

Writer and legacy builder at De Su Mama (www.desumama.com), Vanessa is building a legacy for her biracial children through memoir writing, explorations of personal identity and the documentation of parenting values, traditions, travel and food culture. She is a bicultural Latina in an interracial marriage who believes in creating a purposed legacy and is driven to help other parents do the same.

It has been quite awhile since I breastfed my little ones but even so it is one of those subjects that I am still deeply passionate and opinionated about. From the time my youngest was born I knew I would breastfeed and mostly that was because my own mother had. I recall her breastfeeding my younger brother well into his toddler years and she talked about the joy of breastfeeding so enthusiastically that I knew I had do the same when I became a mother. This made me the odd one out among my friends and peers but I also found that I truly enjoyed the whole breastfeeding experience and I fed my oldest child this way until I had to return to work, about four months after his birth.
Read more of Tiffany Washko’s story at Breastmilk is Superfood for Babies | Nature Moms Blog. 

Tiffany is a green, paleo, crossfit mom of three. She is concerned about health, wellness, and sustainability issues. 

It has been quite awhile since I breastfed my little ones but even so it is one of those subjects that I am still deeply passionate and opinionated about. From the time my youngest was born I knew I would breastfeed and mostly that was because my own mother had. I recall her breastfeeding my younger brother well into his toddler years and she talked about the joy of breastfeeding so enthusiastically that I knew I had do the same when I became a mother. This made me the odd one out among my friends and peers but I also found that I truly enjoyed the whole breastfeeding experience and I fed my oldest child this way until I had to return to work, about four months after his birth.

Read more of Tiffany Washko’s story at Breastmilk is Superfood for Babies | Nature Moms Blog

Tiffany is a green, paleo, crossfit mom of three. She is concerned about health, wellness, and sustainability issues. 

At both hospitals, I was asked immediately after delivering my sons (and maybe even before), what my feeding plans would be. With my first son, it was challenging to get the hang of the process, struggling not only from the pain of a c-section but also the pain of the new sensation. However, with the help of the lactation consultants, we were able to get him feeding. They even followed up with me once I was sent home. (via Breastfeeding Saves Babies Lives: The First Hour Superfood)

Tawanna Browne Smith is a travel writer for 10 Best.com, freelance writer/blogger, and family travel strategist. She has a Masters in Public Policy - International Economic Development but has chosen to stay home to care for her critically ill son. She’s happily married to her Navy husband and two energetic boys. To learn more about Tawanna, you can find her at www.momsguidetotravel.com.

At both hospitals, I was asked immediately after delivering my sons (and maybe even before), what my feeding plans would be. With my first son, it was challenging to get the hang of the process, struggling not only from the pain of a c-section but also the pain of the new sensation. However, with the help of the lactation consultants, we were able to get him feeding. They even followed up with me once I was sent home. (via Breastfeeding Saves Babies Lives: The First Hour Superfood)

Tawanna Browne Smith is a travel writer for 10 Best.com, freelance writer/blogger, and family travel strategist. She has a Masters in Public Policy - International Economic Development but has chosen to stay home to care for her critically ill son. She’s happily married to her Navy husband and two energetic boys. To learn more about Tawanna, you can find her at www.momsguidetotravel.com.

I was lucky enough to breastfeed all four children after they were born. All of them went straight to the breast after birth, except for my second born, who was born via c-section and kept apart for a few hours. Although my older two were switched to formula not long after we came home (due to lack of education and support), I still am proud that I was able to feed them breast milk for the first few days of their lives.

Read more of Stacie’s story at Breastfeeding: Super Food, Lifesaver #FirstHour

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According to a new report by Save the Children, women who choose to breastfeed their baby in the first hour after giving birth can literally be saving their baby’s life. This report, called Superfood for Babies, says that 830,000 babies could be saved EVERY YEAR by breastfeeding in the first hour, even more if mothers are able to breastfeed for 6 months or more. 

While I had a very positive experience breastfeeding our son after giving birth unfortunately this experience doesn’t happen for all women around the globe. Breastfeeding is critical to preventing malnutrition and saving children’s lives in the developing world.

Read more of Sojourner’s story at Sojourner Marable Grimmett: Breastfeed Babies: How Breastfeeding Saves Children’s Lives #Firsthour

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Sojourner Marable Grimmett is one of Georgia’s top Mom Bloggers. Grimmett engages, educates, and empowers thousands of readers monthly through her blog, Married with Two Boys. A social media consultant, community organizer, and global advocate, Grimmett is founder of SOJOURNER, a social media consulting firm, and co-founder of Table for Two, a national campaign to establish lactation rooms in public places. She lives in Atlanta with her husband, and their two young sons.

As I sat in the nursery trying to breastfeed for the first time, a nurse stood over me. My daughter had trouble latching on, in turn, causing me frustration and tension between the nurse and I. Breastfeeding was a lot more difficult than I expected. Things didn’t get better. Talia, my daughter, was Jaundice. We were told that we needed to supplement by bottle-feeding. Although it helped my daughter recover from Jaundice, it severely impeded my hopes of breast-feeding regularly, and I eventually had to stop. The guilt I felt was overwhelming but I didn’t think I had any other choice.

Read more of Shivani’s story at Help Save A Newborn BabyTrending Mom

Shivani Cotter was born in India, migrated to the US when she was 7, and currently resides in Massachusetts.  She and her husband have two daughters, two dogs and a lot of fun!  Shivani’s website, Trending Mom, is about leaving a lovely legacy, and teaching others how easy it is to live in a selfless manner and leave a positive mark in the world.